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Which coast or ocean best for allergy sufferers?

I live in Georgia and my sinuses are driving me crazy. The doctor says move to the coast and live on the ocean. But which one? Does any one out there have an answer as to the best place to live if you have severe sinus infections all the time. I did live on the South Carolina coast once and I don’t believe I was sick at all due to my sinus. If anyone out there has an answer, plz get in touch. — T., Georgia

22 Comments

  1. Trent says:

    Hi there,

    I’ve noticed the same thing myself especially when I was visiting Hawaii, specifically on the island of Oahu and I have never felt so better. It seems that it’s very productive having salt in the air that helps moisturize our sinuses. I have been to South Carolina too. I would think as long as you’re near ocean, either coast would just be great.

  2. Mara says:

    I got asthma when I lived in Monterey California, so I don’t think it has anything to do with the salt air. I never had a problem with asthma in NY, Florida, or Texas but living on the coast caused so many problems. I had horrible asthma and allergy attacks there.

  3. Jade says:

    I’ve had the opposite problem moving to the coast. I didn’t have allergies until I moved to the coast. Unfortunately, I’m allergic to “pond scum” and molds, which is quite prolific in the swampy, coastal environment. My advice is move to an area that contains the least amount of allergens responsible for you allergic response.

  4. Melanie says:

    Interesting comment Monterey– I lived in Santa Cruz oceanside for 22 years and developed allergies and asthma . but its the same area you are basically from.. still the American Lung Association rates that area an A on all levels for air quality …
    I live near Harrisburg, Pa now– one of the worst rated areas for asthma and I have been doing ok this past year… LOL but was
    getting worse until I moved out of an old house and into a very new apartment complex.

    Guess alot depends upon what allergens you have and are exposed to … maybe if all of us asthmatics could lived ON the ocean we’d be better off LOL (and maybe tax free?) GRIN
    Maybe someone should create a giant floating asthma-free ocean liner-city! LOL
    Dunno– might make a ton of bucks on that idea… grin

  5. Candace says:

    I might as well be an expert on Asthma. My son has had it for 10 years, and. me, for 39 years. Being someone who goes to the beach (the florida panhandle) every year since I was born, and, my son every year, I can tell you it has nothing to do with the ocean whether your asthma symptoms act up or not. It can get very humid on the gulf and the air can get very nasty when you are having problems with your asthma. I am from Alabama but have lived in Atlanta since 2000, and, I can tell you my asthma is not half as bad here as it was in Alabama, although, my sons is pretty bad. Especially in the months of Sept, Oct, and some of November. He gets sick on the beach to with asthma if the air quality in the rooms we stay in is not right. I think its best to find out what you are allergic to and what seasons bring your worst symptoms and up your asthma regime during that time-period. No matter where you live.

  6. Tim says:

    I live in Syracuse and I am suffering like nobodys business in the fall of the year. The sneezing is ridiculous and nothing works; not astelin; not claritin; not Zyrtek. I was suprised when they said that his place was one of the best places to live for people like us. Obviously they are not asking the people who are buying OTC products off the shelves!

  7. Dee V Staufer says:

    I am looking forward to relocating from Cortland, N.y. I have Rhinitis….hayweed here has made it worse. I am thinking of moving to Fl. around the Fort Meyers area or Tifton, Ga. which is an hour or so from Atlanta, Ga. I would greatly appreciate any information on these areas. Thank you. You may email me a reply at deevstaufer@yahoo.com

  8. Lees says:

    lol I like how all Asthma and Sinus cases are *exactly the same*. You guys may be totes familiar with your particular allergies, but there are some sinus issues that call for salty air.

    Just go back to the South Carolina coast.

  9. Dawn Holley says:

    I live in Mississippi and my asthma has been under control for many years. I can go on vacation to the beach; Gulf of Mexico; Gulf Shores, AL and my asthma bothers me the entire time I’m there. I was wondering what in the world it could be that I am so allergic to. I have not been allergy tested in about 20 years. Does anyone have any ideas? Is it the air, the sand, the ocean?

  10. Meade says:

    Allergies are worse in the Southeast states- i.e. Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, etc. But along the coasts its much better. I feel tons better on the beaches on VA and NC than inland. Im not sure why. It might have to do with less pollen and ragweed, but also the salt air which is refreshing.

    The mountains are also better for allergies. But the piedmont and lowland is the worst.

  11. Mommy in the Sky says:

    I am an allergy sufferer. In fact, I spent 18 months on long term disability from my job as a flight attendant because of recurrent sinus infections that kept me grounded. When I say recurrent, I mean constant. I would have one terrific infection per month, each time the recovery from it took longer to the point where I was only having approx. one week a month that I was semi-healthy enough to fly. After 4 major sinus surgeries to repair damage from so many infections, I am no better. My doctors (multiple because of being desperate for answers), have all told me the same thing…..St.Petersburg, Florida is the worse place for me to live! I notice that when I travel, I have a clear head in Salt Lake City, Utah, Portland, Oregon and Seattle, Washington. So, I don’t know if ocean or coastal living has anything to do with it. In St. Pete I live on the water….Tampa Bay is literally 5 steps out my back door. Seattle is coastal, Portland is fairly close to the Pacific and Salt Lake is totally inland. So, who knows! The coastal theory doesn’t fit my circumstance. All I know is, I’m packing my bags and moving my family out of Florida!

  12. Jason says:

    i had chronic sinus infections and found a doctor who put me antifungal drugs which cleared up the infection once and for all so it was definitely fungal sinusitis in my case. But i still get allergies, just not infections. If it is a fungal/mould problem you have I’d suggest anywhere dry – don’t they say to take your sinuses to Arizona? I live in Akld NZ which is a nightmare for allergies because it is a very humid climate, I’m thinking of emigrating…

  13. Betsy says:

    Sea air is generally cleaner and less polluted except for large urban areas. Oceans and forests also give off negative ions and ozone that make us feel better. The west coast of Florida is evidently one of the better environments in the country. But with the high humidity level, rain, and storm damage many buildings have mold issues, many of which are unseen and can negate any positive effect. Desert climates can also be helpful for some but for example many areas in Arizona are terrible for allergies because people brought so many of their favorite plants trees and shrubs from around the country. If you have allergies and move it takes your body up to 3 years develop new ones. So visiting or moving to a different climate can make us feel good but eventually we can even get worse. The indoor environment is at least as important as the climate-it is estimated that up to 1/3 of residential structures have serious mold issues…

  14. Reda says:

    hi there , i have never had allergy on my life intel i moved to atlanta and i lived there 10 miserable years of allergy ,but one day i went to africa for a vacation and you know even they have sand and dast every where over there , which i also have allergy too , i didn’t even sneeze at all because the weather is dry and i released that most locals over there have no allergy , i went to a doctor and asked him , why locals here don’t have allergy like we do in the states his answer was because we have a dry weather here , which worked for you , so i got it i moved to arizona and since then i have never used allergy med at all , i use to use zertec because claritine will do nothing to me . i hope my story helps some one . good luck .

  15. ROGER RUSSELL says:

    I LIVED IN AZ FOR MANY YEARS AND GOT BAD ALLERGIES FROM THE BLOOMING TREES. ALSO I WAS TOLD IT IS IN THE DIRT . WE MOVED TO TAMPA AND I WAS BETTER BY THE WATER. I LIVE 33 MILES NORTH OF TAMPA 1 MILE FROM THE OCEAN. WE MOVED BACK INTO ARE OLD HOME BACK IN AR(TUCSON) HURRICANES SCARED US AWAY AND INSTALLED A NEW TRANE SYSTEM WITH CLEAN AIR EFFECTS WHICH DID NOTHING TO HELP. MY DOCTOR WHO IS ONE OF THE SOUTHWESTS TOP ENTS TOLD ME IT TAKES ABOUT 3 YEARS TO READJUST THEN IT CAN COME BACK. 3 YEARS LATER WELL I AM SICK AGAIN. EVERY TIME I GO TO PUERTA PENASCO MEXICO ON THE OCEAN(SEA OF CORTEZ) IT ALL GOES AWAY. MAYBE IT IS THE CLEAN SALT AIR AND VERY LITTLE CAR POLLUTION OR TREES AND GRASSES . I NOW HAVE TESTED IT 3 TIMES AND IT WORKS. MINE IS A FUNGAL CONDITION AND I DO NOT NEED ANY MEDS HERE AT ALL. JUST SOME INPUT – BUT YOU CAN GET A KENALOG SHOT THAT LAST ABOUT 6 MONTHS MOST DOCS DO NOT WANT TO TELL YOU THAT

  16. Adam says:

    I had occasional mild seasonal allergies for 25 years living in Portland and Corvallis Oregon. The allergies disappeared after moving to Boston and didn’t come back for two years until I moved to Santa Cruz California. Now I have allergies—at home and at the office—year round.

    I don’t know what causes them, but spending long periods indoors (particularly when lying in bed at night) seems to aggravate them. Funny that someone should mention Oahu. I went on vacation there for a week recently. No allergies at all there.

    Perhaps it’s the wet, temperate climates of NoCal and the Pacific Northwest that encourage mold growth in houses and offices. To contrast, Boston’s climate is so extreme that the heat and AC are running almost continuously throughout the year. Also, many old buildings in Boston run on steam heat, the pipes of which probably keep the walls dry. That doesn’t explain Hawaii, though…

  17. Terri says:

    I too have sinus rhinitis (?), allergies and asthma; lived in Anchorage, AK for 22 years and now live in Greensboro/Winston-Salem, NC since 10/05. I have NEVER had so many ear, nose and throat problems until here. Was told that NC ranks pretty high as for the 50 states with mold problems. Recommended for allergy shots but NO guarantees there either:)

  18. VWIESE says:

    The main problem with living on the coastline depends on whether the wind or draft comes from the ocean or mainland. As you can imagine, winds from the ocean would bring in salt, thus immediate relief. However, winds from inland would accumulate all the pollen from vegetation and other bothersome allergens which would be more intense. So, check the weather and winds that day and determine when you should expose yourself to a healing dose of good air while taking advantage of the wonders of the beach, sand and surf … or whether you should remain indoors!

  19. Brenny says:

    I have traveled so many places when I was younger due to my dad being in the military. I get bad allergies during season changes and summer when I was in Nebraska, Kansas and Conneticut. I now live in Alaska and even though there is more grass and trees I don’t have as much problem with my allergies like I did in the midwest. I did talk to my doctor once and he mentioned a place by water and less populated with polution. Well since I love the outdoors and the scenery here and my allergies aren’t as bad I stayed in Alaska. I’ve talked to some friends and co-workers and they said far Northwest and Northeast are best. States like Washington, Oregon, Alaska, Maine and so on. Hope this helps?

  20. James says:

    I grew up in Amarillo Texas and had seasonal winter allergies only. Then I moved to Tulsa and lived there for 12 years and same thing…winter seasonal…then I lived 3 years in St. Louis Mo. and had no allergies at all…Now after 7 years in Lubbock Texas with all the hot dry dirt storms, the massive drought, and the cotton dust and the fertilizers and defoliants every where I have never felt worse. I get rashes (contact dermatitis) have dry damaged skin and the meds and steroid shots are worthless….moving back to St. Louis to see if I can heal up…cold wet winters and hot wet summers…the humidity seems to be the key..

    1. denis nadar says:

      Hii everybody my name is denis I am suffering from climate allergy so his the ocean or sea life is good for allergy or not I dont know

      1. Lois (admin) says:

        Denis, first you should see an allergist to determine what you are allergic to, and follow their recommendations. When it comes to climate, it’s often a mixed bag, as you can see from the many comments on this post. What works for one may not work for another, and what is bad for one may be great for another. The hope is that, by comparing our situation with comments by others, we can gain an overall picture of what may work best for us. Even so, there are many variables. A climate may be helpful for a person’s allergies in one season and horrible in another. New allergies can develop after a person has lived in a different climate for awhile. Some allergens, such as dust mites, are present year-round wherever we go. But I do hope this blog will help you get some ideas of what may work best in your situation. Unfortunately, trial and error is often the only way to know for sure what helps, and even that can change over time.

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